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Regaining Strength After StrokeTailwind featured in Discoveries + Breakthroughs - 05/01/2011 Regaining Strength After Stroke Read the article ยป

Clinical Trials: The Science Behind Tailwind

University of Maryland Medical School inventors and researchers devised the Bilateral Arm Trainer with Rhythmic Auditory Cueing (BATRAC).

patient uses BATRAC (now Tailwind) in clinical trialPh.D. researchers in physical therapy and kinesiology at the University of Maryland, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, developed the Bilateral Arm Trainer with Rhythmic Auditory Cueing (BATRAC). To study their theory that BATRAC could work, Maryland researchers conducted several clinical trials beginning in 2000, in which more than 100 patients were studied. In one trial, BATRAC users were randomly assigned to use BATRAC for one hour, three times a week, for six weeks. After six weeks of using the device, stroke survivors improved their ability to use and control their muscles and movements. These changes were also noticeable in patients who had their stroke as many as 20 years previously.

Read more about the scientific studies here.

"We observed the effect the Tailwind repetitive bilateral training had on people who have chronic motor impairment following stroke.  Our findings suggest that Tailwind restores upper body movement to stroke survivors. We recommend Tailwind as a potential therapy for upper extremity rehabilitation for stroke survivors."
—Daniel F. Hanley, MD

In 2000, the journal Stroke, the Journal of the American Heart Association, published "Repetitive Bilateral Arm Training with Rhythmic Auditory Cueing Improves Motor Function in Chronic Hemiparetic Stroke." This article described the results of a study which concluded that six weeks of BATRAC use improved functional motor performance as well as changes in isometric strength and range of motion.

The study found that using the arm rehabilitation and paralysis recovery device helped patients who had suffered a stroke at least six months earlier. After six weeks of using the device three times a week, stroke survivors who improved their ability to use and control their muscles and movements also demonstrated a re-organization of the brain indicating that a healthy part of the brain took over the function of damaged parts.

After several training sessions, stroke patients showed marked improvement in movement and function. These changes were also noticeable in patients who suffered a stroke as many as 20 years earlier.